The 411 On 4:44: Track 01 “Kill Jay Z”

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Jumping right in, this track is all about killing Jay Z’s old ego. He discusses incidents that were highly publicized in the past, and raps about how terribly he handled those incidents (i.e. Solange altercation).

For those with wide eyes, notice that the name of this track is Kill Jay Z, which was his stage name before the album dropped, now it is officially Jay-Z, (with the dash). So to me, this makes the album a lot more significant. As if the content of the album and the dialogue is coming from an entirely different person.

All in all, this song is about killing off an ego, the ego that got him into fights with Solange in the elevator. This song also addresses a few issues with Kanye.

I was watching an episode of Chappelle’s Show where Common and Kanye performed ‘The Food”. It was so different from the Kanye we have now, like who is dis? Jay went in on his latest antics, most directly his onstage outburst in Sacramento. I really liked this part because he says :

{You dropped outta school, you lost your principles}

Not only do you lose your principals (administration) when you drop outta school, in Kanye’s case, it seems that he lost his principles (morals and values) after he dropped College Dropout. Points for Jigga.

I also wanna bring points for Jigga on the Eric Benet and Future references.

{You almost went Eric Benét/Let the baddest girl in the world get away}

After allegations of cheating on Halle Berry, Eric Benet and Halle ended up splitting in 2003-2004. Consequently, Eric Benet let one of the baddest females in the world get away. (Beyonce would be another that Jay almost pulled an Eric Benet with and let get away)

{I don’t even know what you woulda done/In the Future, other niggas playin’ football with your son}

We all know that Future has been going back and forth with Russell Wilson and Ciara over baby Future. So this play on words is not only points for Jigga but Russell as well. Like a “HA!” moment.

For me this was an emotional track to listen to. It took a lot for Jay to basically admit to his mistakes and own up about his wrongs in just one track. And he did it over wickedly laced and looped track by none other than Chicago legend No I.D..

Now this isn’t my favorite track but this is most definitely competing for most introspective on the album.

 

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